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#61- Why Did the Articles of Confederation Fail?

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This week, Scott and Karl read the Articles of Confederation. This “firm league of friendship” was written in 1777, stemming from wartime urgency. However, it was not actually ratified until 1781.

It now lays on the ash heap of history, formally replaced by the present United States Constitution on March 4, 1789.

Under these articles, the states remained sovereign and independent, with Congress serving as the last resort on appeal of disputes. Karl says, “It does not impose anything from the top down. You wonder, why did they get rid of it?”

Tune in to this week’s episode and learn more about the first governing document of the United States of America.

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Articles of confederation. the articles of confederation and perpetual union was the first written constituion of the united states. 1777 congress served as the last resport on the appeals and idsuptues. The Articles of Confederation and Perpetual Union was the first written constitution of the United States. Written in 1777 and stemming from wartime urgency, its progress was slowed by fears of central authority and extensive land claims by states. It was not ratified until March 1, 1781. Under these articles, the states remained sovereign and independent, with Congress serving as the last resort on appeal of disputes. Significantly, The Articles of Confederation named the new nation “The United States of America.” Congress was given the authority to make treaties and alliances, maintain armed forces and coin money. However, the central government lacked the ability to levy taxes and regulate commerce, issues that led to the Constitutional Convention in 1787 for the creation of new federal laws under The United States Constitution.

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